MONDAY
January 14, 2019 | doors at 8:30pm
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Triple Ds presents:
STONEFIELD
A Drug Called Tradition | Mathis Hunter Band
  • $10
  • $12
  • ADVANCE
  • DAY OF SHOW
Stonefield
It all started in a shed.
More specifically, it started in a shed on a family hobby farm in a tiny rural township in Victoria, Australia.
The four Findlay sisters, who’d go on to become the earthen psych-rock opal that is Stonefield, had been granted their wish of a drum kit by their parents, whose Zappa, Hendrix and Zeppelin records had long been the shared soundtrack of the household. Amy – the oldest Findlay, though at that time just 15 – took a particular shine to the kit and soon began lessons, her practice sessions echoing out across the family’s acreage. It wasn’t long, however, before her sisters were drawn back into the shelter as, one by one, they found their own instruments to wrangle with. Hannah, then 13, started on guitar. Sarah, 12, took on the keyboard. Holly, just seven years old, listened in on her sisters practicing and, perhaps hearing that something was missing, asked her father for a bass.
Stonefield’s first song ‘Foreign Lover’ was recorded for a project Amy was working on as part of her tertiary studies. When they arrived home from the studio that day, the siblings’ mother suggested they enter the track in triple j’s Australia-wide unsigned band competition, Unearthed High. The deadline for entries was that night. They weren’t convinced they had a chance, but decided to give it a shot.
Soon enough, ‘Foreign Lover’ was all over triple j, followed shortly by infectious rock stomper ‘Through The Clover,’ the song they were given the opportunity to record as part of the competition’s first prize. Stonefield was invited to showcase at the inaugural One Movement music and arts conference in Perth, which resulted in [renowned band booker] Martin Elbourne, inviting the band to play the 2011 Glastonbury Festival on the spot.
Over the next two years, the girls wrote and released their second EP Bad Reality. They released their debut self-titled album in October 2013. It entered the AIR charts at #6 and the ARIA charts at #21. The three singles released from the album, including Put Your Curse On Me, received immense support from triple j, and the Southern Cross Network, including MMM.
The album was well received by both the industry and general public. Such was the demand that Stonefield embarked on a national tour, spanning 22 dates and 5 states. The second single Love You Deserve took up a life entirely of its own, and the band set out on yet another tour.
By this time, the international market had caught wind of the incendiary band from rock journo heaven, and the girls headed to the UK during May to play showcases, as well as Dot to Dot festivals across the UK. In November 2013, Stonefield won the inaugural Age Music Victoria Award for Best Regional Act.
After a huge amount of touring the country last year, 2015 kicked off with the band being awarded 'APRA Rock Work Of the Year' for their song 'Love you Deserve'. Stonefield secured the support slot for one of their idol bands Fleetwood Mac in November and kicked off 2016 with a memorable US tour around SXSW, making waves across the South West. Later this year will see the sophomore release from Stonefield. The first taste ’Stranger’ is an exciting glimpse of the new music to come.
A Drug Called Tradition
In their debut album, Medicine Music (out July 28), Atlanta trio A Drug Called Tradition fuses shoegaze, krautrock, and psych rock influences with the heavy atmosphere of their southern roots. The eight-minute opening track, “With You Miss You,” bursts onto the scene with brooding vocals and saturated guitar pulses before breaking and leading the listener on a Can-inspired odyssey of layered intensity and release. This journey continues through the rest of the album, each track seemingly standing on its own before revealing its place in the larger whole.

After the dissolution of heavy psych stalwarts Abby Gogo, singer/guitarist Bon Allinson began working on a batch of songs more heavily influenced by his upbringing in Alabama and by the musical traditions of the South. He brought these songs to drummer Pumakawa “Puma” Navarro (Abby Gogo) and bassist Asha Lakra (Tikka) and the trio hit the ground running. They played their first set opening for Matt Hollywood of Brian Jonestown Massacre and soon after recorded a three song demo with Spencer Garn at Diamond Street Studios. The band gained a reputation as one of the most intense acts in Atlanta and around the South playing with acts such as Lee Bains III and the Glory Fires, Holy Wave, Spaceface, White Reaper, and Froth.

Ready to set the songs they’d crafted to two-inch tape, ADCT headed to Water Valley, Mississippi to record Medicine Music with producer Matt Patton (Drive-By Truckers, Dexateens), and engineer Bronson Tew at Dial Back Sound (owned at the time by Bruce Watson of Fat Possum Records). The band stayed in the small apartment adjacent to the studio, working in marathon sessions that ended in all involved crashing wherever was convenient. The tracks were also mixed and mastered at Dial Back Sound and pressed to vinyl at Gotta Groove Records. Now with their debut album in hand, ADCT has teamed up with Psych Army Intergalactic and are ready to conquer the rest of the U. S. and then the world.
MATHIS HUNTER BAND
Mathis Hunter Band
Mathis Hunter is a true rock ‘n’ roll journeyman — an Atlanta music renaissance man to some, a Southern rocker of the highest mystical order to others. Somewhere between the post-punk funk of his former band the Selmanaires, and the full tilt boogie of Noot d’ Noot, Hunter reconnected with his roots. On his sophomore solo LP, Countryman, the multi-instrumentalist twists a melange of psychedelic classic rock excursions into the phantasmagoria of the idlewild South. Songs such as “Ley Lines,” “Aquamarine,” and “The Swirl” are built around lush Gibson Firebird, Fender Rhodes, and strange synthesizer arrangements that take shape as the first full flowering of Hunter’s drive toward pop grandeur.

Hunter’s 2010 solo debut, Soft Opening, featured his first forays into heavily layered soundscapes culled from equal parts Summer of Love-era Traffic and the Rolling Stones with ‘90s British rock ala Primal Scream and Storm in Heaven era Verve. Countryman raises the stakes as Hunter steps out as a solo artist once again, with contributions from Frosted Orange/Purkinje Shift drummer Lee Corum, pedal steel, slide guitar, and piano from members of Sailing To Denver, and keyboards from longtime collaborator Rich Morris.

With so many Anglophile influences converging here, there still is something inherently Southern that comes home to roost on Countryman’s title track; a song bound by a looseness and rhythmic fusion that reveals a more exotic side of the South. Glimpses of polychromatic dream sequences scattered throughout take shape as blue-eyed cosmic funk and soul colliding headfirst with Krautrock rhythms and visceral guitar textures. There’s no doubt when all of these elements are amplified, Hunter’s roots form a swelling, and quintessential guitar-oriented space Southern rock opus.
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