SATURDAY
October 13, 2018 | doors at 8:00pm
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Zero Mile presents:
THE ARTISANALS
The Pollies
  • $12
  • $14
  • ADVANCE
  • DAY OF SHOW
 The Artisanals
Somewhere on a dusty road or a well traveled interstate, right at this very moment, a rock n’ roll band is pounding the rock. They’re probably wearing the same clothes they had on yesterday, and reminiscing about last night’s gig. Inspired by a guitar lick that cuts to the bone or a melody that lingers on refrain, this band is following a path forged by countless other musicians who’ve lived and died in dive bars or ‘made it’ with their posters taped to bedroom walls. What makes this band of brothers any different? This band is The Artisanals.

Johnny Delaware grew up in a small South Dakota town surrounded by cornfields and dirt roads. For 19 years, he lived in a wide-eyed perspective baptized in the setting of a John Mellencamp song. In order to personally evolve and carry out his musical destiny, Delaware knew that the heartland wind would have to blow him around the country. Eventually, Delaware would move to Charleston, SC and team up with guitarist Clay Houle, drummer Josh Hoover, and bassist Eric Mixon to form The Artisanals in late 2016. Within a year of forming, The Artisanals dropped their four-track debut EP, Literally, Anywhere, and promptly received critical acclaim from Huffington Post, Paste Magazine, Daytrotter, PopMatters.

Now, The Artisanals are set to drop their debut self-titled full length album. Produced by Wolfgang Zimmerman and set to release on AWAL on September 21, 2018, The Artisanals, is the first ever record to come out of the Magic Barn – an Iowa studio-converted-barn that features the Neve console and gear from NYC’s now defunct Magic Shop Studio which recorded David Bowie’s last two albums, Arcade Fire’s The Suburbs, and can be seen on Dave Grohl’s Sonic Highways.

With sonic influences ranging from the heartland rock of Bruce Springsteen (“Angel 42”), and neo-psychedelia anthems of My Morning Jacket (“Pound The Rock”), to the dream-pop work of The Cars and The War On Drugs (“Drag”), The Artisanals 10-track LP showcases Delaware and Houle’s knack for writing hooks as well as their ear for quality production. The album utilizes everything from a gong, organ, piano, sitar, french horn, trombone, and koto, to a string section sourced from the nearby University of Iowa. Mastered by Howie Weinberg, (Spoon, Ryan Adams, Nirvana), there’s no filler on The Artisanals. From start to finish, this record is a straight banger.
The Pollies
“NOT HERE” IS THE NEW FULL-LENGTH LP FROM THE POLLIES, A BAND THAT HAS BEEN DEFYING GENRES AND STEPPING OVER BOUNDARIES SINCE THEIR FIRST RELEASE IN 2012.

It’s their first release for Florence, AL’s Single Lock Records, and it shows the band shedding their alt-country skin in favor of experimental noise and unadulterated risk.

"Not Here" is how I felt when I wrote the majority of the songs for this record,” lead singer and songwriter Jay Burgess says. “I was almost living parallel to myself. I’m watching myself react to what some people probably view as "normal life occurrences", but for me, someone who’s never been through these "normal life occurrences", it was very difficult.”

Burgess is the songwriter behind The Pollies, and on “Not Here”, he hits on all the familiar topics— love, loss, triumph and regret— with an edge and ferocity that shows up on tracks like “Lost” and “Jackson”. Simply put, these are compelling stories—and Burgess has stepped into his own as a gifted storyteller.


“Love lost is what drives the record lyrically,” Burgess says. “Some of these songs started as musical ideas—where I’d record something on my phone and then go back 3-4 times and make sense of the words—and other songs were just there without a lot of work.”

“Lost”, the record’s lead single, started as one phrase and a host of different musical ideas.


“It was a song that I had sitting around with unfinished and unrealized lyrics,” Burgess says. “I’d do multiple recordings of it with different lyrics. One phrase I kept coming back to was “I wish I was lost”. For weeks, that one line stayed on my notepad. Soon after that, a friend of mine found out his marriage was falling apart. I was someone for him to talk to, and after one of our conversations one night, the words for “Lost” just fell into place.”

Another standout track, “Jackson”, came together in a much quicker fashion—with a far different focus.

“I’ve always been into revolutions—more specifically thinking about what things would be like if they hadn’t happened,” Burgess says. “Obviously, a major movement in this country’s history was the Civil Rights movement. I think about how long that effort took and how great the risk was and it’s amazing to me. I thought I had heard all of the stories that went along with the movement until I heard the story of Jimmie Lee Jackson.”

“At the time, there was no movie explaining him and his involvement with the Selma story. He’s pretty much the reason Dr. King came to Selma, and I found his story inspiring in many different ways. I had to write something about him, and frankly, I could’ve probably done an entire record on him.”

The subject matter changes, but the themes remain: love, loss, triumph and regret. It’s clear that Burgess is the kind of songwriter that throws a lot of curveballs. Accompanied by a deft and accomplished band, “Not Here” is the kind of statement that signals the arrival of a great American band.
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