FRIDAY
April 7, 2017 | doors at 10:00pm
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Triple Ds and Tight Bros. Network present:
SHANNON AND THE CLAMS
Small Reactions | Art School Jocks
Due to circumstances beyond our control, doors have been pushed back to 10:00 PM

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Shannon and The Clams
The American West. America’s America. It was here in three very different worlds that Shannon and the Clams were spawned. From the dark redwood forests of Oregon emerged Cody Blanchard: singer and guitarist. The dusty walnut orchards and vineyards of northern California gave us Shannon Shaw: singer and bassist. Out of the lonely dunes of California’s central coast shambled Nate Mayhem: drummer and keys. These three talented visual artists were drawn separately to Oakland, California and it was there that the Clams began playing house parties and grimy clubs.

The band was forged in the anachronistic remote communities of the west, in some strange mixture of computer show and country fair; their music is some odd alloy of The Last Picture Show and The Decline of Western Civilization. The pioneer spirit of western life is all over this band: pushing into the unknown, blazing their own trail, creating their own destiny, with the accompanying canyon-esque loneliness and untamed joy only truly known by those with the courage to pull up stakes and head off into the big empty sunset.

Gone by the Dawn, the newest Shannon and the Clams album, is their best work to date. The music is complex, the lyrical content is emotionally raw and honest, and the production is the strangest it’s ever been. The album was written as one member was recovering from a serious breakup and another was deep in one. The lyrics reflect it, and the entire album is dripping with sadness, pain, and introspection. Shannon and Cody have not written generic songs about love or the lack of it. Instead they have written about their very own specific heartbreak, mistreatment, and mental trials. The emotion is palpable. On Gone by the Dawn the Clams have DARED TO BE REAL. They’ve exposed their true emotions, which is what's most moving about the album. People are scared to be so real. Society does not encourage it. Folks remain guarded to protect themselves from being mocked, punished, and becoming outcast . The Clams have opted to forgo the potential tongue-clucking finger-waggers, and have instead had the artistic courage and audacity to splay their pain and struggles out for all to hear. We are lucky to hear them get so damn real.

For Gone by the Dawn, the Oakland trio hooked up with studio wizard and renaissance-man Sonny Smith to record the album at Tiny Telephone Recording in San Francisco. Best known as the driving force behind San Francisco’s beloved Sonny and the Sunsets, Smith uses his refreshing production techniques to create an engaging sonic landscape without compromising the Clams’ signature Lou Christie-meets-The Circle Jerks sound. The Clams have evolved: their skills are sharper, their chops are tighter and weirder and they’ve added new instruments to to the mix. A whole new dimension of the Clams has emerged.

Nowadays, it’s exceedingly rare for a two-and-half minute rock song to have raw emotional power, but with Gone by the Dawn Shannon and the Clams have gifted us an entire album of them.

-Dan Shaw
Small Reactions
Small Reactions play situational pop songs. The quartet is equal parts new wave and post-punk, drone and surf.

Ultimately, however, genres are of little import--the band themselves prefer the term “nerve pop” to describe their music. The phrase comprises the frenetic energy of the late 70s new wavers and Bob Dylan’s shaky foot circa 1965. Sonically, they resemble equal parts “Chairs Missing”-period Wire and early Stereolab. Lyrically, they reside somewhere in the “new domestic” school.

Live shows, played to the absolute tipping point, express a sense of urgency, affectation, and a blur of electric noise. Songs refuse cadence naturally and the band will not stop moving.

They released their debut record "Similar Phantoms" in October 2014 and since have completed work on their sophomore album to be released soon. Other items include 2 7"s, 3 cassette releases, and assorted odds and ends. They tour often.

Atlanta, Georgia is their home.
Art School Jocks
The lyrics to "Just A Gwen," from Atlanta pop band Art School Jocks, may ring familiar to women. As guitarist Dianna Settles sings, over slinky, surf-y guitars and a dead-steady beat: "Carry your keys / Between your knuckles / You never know who's trying to follow you home / Smile back and / Say you're sorry / You shouldn't be out this late alone" - They're all part of a litany of reminders that most young women know by heart, a category of precautions we're supposed to take to protect ourselves from harassment or violence. The boredom is palpable in Settles' tone as she sings the catchy, repetitive melody, as if to imply: How many times have we heard this — and how many times has it failed us? This first single from the band's debut self-titled EP is a great example of why Art School Jocks self-applied the description "existential basement pop," with its hooky melody and weighty subject matter (and its titular reference of another pop tribute to frustrating assumptions about womanhood). By taking back the familiar, frustrating language of these safety tips, the band aims to expose their hypocrisy. "'Just a Gwen' is one reminder in a long lineage of reminders that we live in a society that places the responsibility for harassment and rape prevention on the women affected by it," the band says in an email to NPR Music. "Campus organizations, articles and pamphlets suggest ways to avoid becoming a target ranging from self-defense pointers to more conservative fashion recommendations, rather than educating men on consent and the harm of sexual harassment." More than just an eyeroll, "Just a Gwen" is a rallying cry against the assumption that avoiding harassment ought to be the job of those at risk of being harassed. Art School Jocks comes out June 2 on Father/Daughter." -NPR
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